Sustainable Solutions Chevron to Develop New CCS Project in USA

Source: Press release

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Chevron has plans to establish a new carbon capture and storage (CCS) project in San Joaquin Valley, California. CO2 post-combustion capture equipment will also be installed by the firm with an aim to decarbonize and reduce its carbon intensity.

The CCS initiative would begin at Chevron’s Kern River Eastridge cogeneration plant in Kern County, California.
The CCS initiative would begin at Chevron’s Kern River Eastridge cogeneration plant in Kern County, California.
(Source: ©Андрей Трубицын - stock.adobe.com )

Houston/USA – Chevron U.S.A., through its Chevron New Energies division, announced that it is launching a carbon capture and storage (CCS) project aimed at reducing the carbon intensity of its operations in San Joaquin Valley, California.

Chevron aims to reduce its carbon intensity – the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted per unit of energy produced – by installing CO2 post-combustion capture equipment, capturing the CO2 and then safely storing it thousands of feet underground. This CCS initiative would begin at Chevron’s Kern River Eastridge cogeneration plant in Kern County, California.

Chevron has applied to obtain a Conditional Use Permit with the Planning and Natural Resources Department of Kern County and will continue to work with appropriate regulators throughout the process.

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In addition to the Eastridge cogeneration project, Chevron is currently evaluating and deploying multiple carbon capture technology demonstrations to mature more efficient and cost-effective capture solutions, potentially enabling future projects, not only for Chevron, but for other industries.

An August 2020 report by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that highlighted opportunities for California to become carbon neutral noted, “there are various options for geologic storage sites in the state, but we have identified the most promising first candidates in San Joaquin County and in Kern County,” due to the regions’ geologic and subsurface characteristics, as well as the existing oil and natural gas production.

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