Russia: Climate Change Russia Inaugurates its First Carbon Monitoring Site

Editor: Ahlam Rais

The first carbon monitoring site in Russia has opened in the Tyumen Region. The pilot project will be developed in six other regions of the country. The project is considered to be a milestone in the development of the nation’s carbon balance control system.

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The research results will be used in reforestation and agricultural development projects as well as in initiatives to create dedicated carbon farms, i.e. territories with enhanced carbon dioxide absorption capacity.
The research results will be used in reforestation and agricultural development projects as well as in initiatives to create dedicated carbon farms, i.e. territories with enhanced carbon dioxide absorption capacity.
(Source: Pixabay)

Tyumen/Russia – Russia's first carbon monitoring site has opened in the Tyumen Region. It was created at the University of Tyumen (UTMN) research field station with support from Sibur. The opening marks the first milestone in the development of Russia’s carbon balance control system.

The official ceremony was attended by Andrey Fursenko, Aide to the President of the Russian Federation; Valery Falkov, Minister of Science and Higher Education of the Russian Federation; Alexander Moor, Governor of the Tyumen Region; Maxim Remchukov, Head of Sibur’s Sustainable Development; and representatives from the government and the science and education communities. The pilot project will be rolled out in seven Russian regions, including the Tyumen Region.

Andrey Fursenko, Aide to the President of the Russian Federation: “The climate is undergoing profound change. One of the key challenges we are facing today is the lack of reliable climatic data to understand what is happening with the climate, what drives climate change, and how this change is unfolding. The availability of reliable data in this field is what will make a difference to our ability to predict climate evolution. To address this, we made a decision more than a year ago to create a network of carbon monitoring sites.”

The first seven carbon monitoring sites can be used as a starting point to develop the scientific framework for monitoring greenhouse gases.

Valery Falkov, Minister of Science and Higher Education of the Russian Federation

Valery Falkov, Minister of Science and Higher Education of the Russian Federation: “The first seven carbon monitoring sites can be used as a starting point to develop the scientific framework for monitoring greenhouse gases. Each site is created in partnership with universities and scientific organizations, with their work guided by their own research agenda, educational and awareness raising missions. We also aim to engage school and university students to help them learn more about this matter. Partnerships with universities and research institutions will be instrumental in addressing the global challenge – to create a science-based system to monitor greenhouse gases that will be recognized in Russia and beyond.”

The Tyumen site has an area of 2.32 ha and covers the region’s most typical ecosystems – different types of forests, lakes, swamps, and agrocenoses. The site’s equipment makes it possible to monitor greenhouse gas emissions across 10,600 ha. The site’s equipment makes it possible to monitor greenhouse gas emissions across 10,600 ha. The researchers will be able to closely study and assess the absorption capacity of each ecosystem, and develop mixes of types and species of plants that match the ecosystem in terms of their ability to absorb carbon dioxide. The research results will be used in reforestation and agricultural development projects as well as in initiatives to create dedicated carbon farms, i.e. territories with enhanced carbon dioxide absorption capacity.

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