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USA: Technip and Chemetry Signed Exclusive Cooperation Licensing and Engineering of Ethylene Dichloride Production Technology

Editor: Alexander Stark

Technip and Chemetry have signed an exclusive cooperation agreement for the licensing and engineering of Chemetry’s eShuttle technology for the production of ethylene dichloride (EDC).

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The eShuttle platform is compatible with Covestro’s oxygen depolarized cathode technology which introduces oxygen into the standard chlor-alkali cathodic reaction eliminating the production of hydrogen and lowering the energy required to produce sodium hydroxide.
The eShuttle platform is compatible with Covestro’s oxygen depolarized cathode technology which introduces oxygen into the standard chlor-alkali cathodic reaction eliminating the production of hydrogen and lowering the energy required to produce sodium hydroxide.
(Source: Chemetry)

Moss Landing/USA — EDC is a commodity chemical used primarily for PVC plastic production. According to the manufacturer, the technology significantly lowers energy use, reduces the carbon footprint and improves the safety of the chlor-alkali and EDC industries. The technology uses a metal halide ion process to produce high purity EDC without the generation of chlorine gas. Additionally, the process was ideally suited for integration with oxygen depolarized cathode technology, which would further increases energy savings. The technology was pioneered by Chemetry’s laboratory and integrated pilot demonstration facilities in Moss Landing, California.

The partners intend to leverage Chemetry’s expertise in electrolyzer design and halide chemistry with Technip’s strength in technology licensing, process scale-up, engineering and procurement. Technip’s operating center in Boston, Massachusetts, United States, will manage the agreement, with support from their office in Lyon, France. Dr. Ryan Gilliam, Chemetry CEO, said: “Since its founding, Chemetry has been focused on redefining how chemicals are made. From lower energy requirements and improved margins, to less impact on the environment and safer operation, we are developing a technology platform that will have a lasting impact.”

The eShuttle technology uses the same feedstocks and produces the same products (EDC, caustic and hydrogen) as conventional processes, making it suitable for retrofitting existing chlor-alkali/EDC plants especially where electrical costs are high, the company claims. It would also offer EDC producers the ability to expand production within the same cell room footprint and power requirements.

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