UK: Decarbonization Consortium to Explore New Catalyst Technology for Net Zero Future

Editor: Ahlam Rais

Under the 12 million dollar ‘Sustainable Catalysis for Clean Growth’ project, BP, Johnson Matthey along with the Cardiff University and The University of Manchester have collaborated to explore new catalyst technology for a net zero future. The partnership aims to convert CO2, waste and sustainable biomass into clean and sustainable fuels and products.

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The ‘Sustainable Catalysis for Clean Growth’ project has been co-funded with 3.68 million dollars from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council and 7.76 million dollars from the companies and University partners.
The ‘Sustainable Catalysis for Clean Growth’ project has been co-funded with 3.68 million dollars from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council and 7.76 million dollars from the companies and University partners.
(Source: Giorgio Trovato/Unsplash)

London/UK – A partnership featuring two leading British universities, Cardiff University and The University of Manchester, together with BP and Johnson Matthey, has been launched to explore the transformation of carbon dioxide, waste products and sustainable biomass into fuels and products that can be used across the energy and transportation sectors. The project is one of the eight business-led Prosperity Partnerships announced in support of the government’s ambitious new Innovation Strategy.

The project is one of the eight business-led Prosperity Partnerships announced in support of the UK Government’s new Innovation Strategy.

Cardiff University, an internationally-leading centre for catalysis research, is leading the project, and The University of Manchester will provide expertise in materials science, characterization methods and catalysis. They are joined by BP and Johnson Matthey. The partnership will devote the next five years to exploring new catalyst technology to help the world get to net zero.

Professor Duncan Wass, Director of the Cardiff Catalysis Institute, said: “The catalysts we use today have been honed over decades to work with specific, fossil fuel resources. As we move to a low carbon, more sustainable, net zero future, we need catalysts that will convert biomass, waste and carbon dioxide into valuable products such as fuels and lubricants. Working in this partnership, we will bring together a wide range of catalysis expertise to uncover new science and contribute towards achieving net zero - perhaps the most pressing objective for us all.”

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