Pharmaceuticals The Indian Pharmaceutical Industry 2013: Coming of Age in a Global Market

Editor: Dominik Stephan

Following a patchy performance in 2010/11, many observers questioned what the future might hold for the mainly generic Indian pharmaceutical companies, as health funders put downward pressure on generic prices. However, the industry has bounced back to profit, but the question is what's next?

Related Companies

(Picture: PROCESS India)

The 20 companies examined in this report had combined sales of more than US$17.4 billion in their most recently reported fiscal year, which generally concluded on 31st March 2012. Ranbaxy reported revenue of Rs.99,769 million (US $ 2,145 million) for the calendar year ended 31st December 2011, making it the leading company in terms of revenue. Of the companies listed, 18 reported improved sales over 2010/11.

New Guidance on Biosimilar Manufacture

In 2012, new Guidelines on Similar Biologics were published. The Guidelines were prepared by the Central Drugs Standard Control Organisation and the Department of Biotechnology, and lay down the regulatory pathway for a biologic claiming to be similar to an already authorised reference biologic.

Where have all the outbound mergers gone?

Many Indian companies have pursued an aggressive acquisition policy in order to accelerate market growth or acquire manufacturing capacity. Prior to the economic downturn in 2008, this policy could be clearly seen with 10 acquisition/controlling stake deals announced in the year. Pressure on prices and variable performance have firmly put a lid on this activity, Sun Pharma's eventual control of Taro being one of the few deals to go through since. Inward investment has equally been affected as interest in Indian companies has cooled.

India's domestic market: not achieving necessary growth

With a population of over one billion and a growing middle class in excess of 300 million people with disposable income and increasing healthcare expectations, the domestic formulations market has enormous potential for growth. But India is a country of wide economic divide and while a growing number of people can afford to pay for good quality private healthcare, for the bulk of its vast rural population all but basic healthcare provision will remain out of reach for the foreseeable future.

(ID:39570200)