Net-Zero Emissions Exxonmobil Develops Unique Process Technology for Producing SAF from Methanol

Source: Press release

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Exxonmobil has developed an innovative methanol-to-jet SAF technology by using renewable methanol as feedstock. The move is aimed at decarbonizing the aviation industry and achieving a net-zero future.

Methanol derived from the gasification of biomass and waste, as well as from lower-carbon hydrogen and captured CO₂, can be converted into SAF using Exxonmobil’s methanol to jet proprietary process technology and catalysts.
Methanol derived from the gasification of biomass and waste, as well as from lower-carbon hydrogen and captured CO₂, can be converted into SAF using Exxonmobil’s methanol to jet proprietary process technology and catalysts.
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Houston/USA – Exxonmobil has recently announced a unique process technology to enable the manufacture of sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) from renewable methanol.

“SAF produced from renewable methanol can play an important role in helping the aviation industry achieve the transition to a net-zero future. Reaching that goal by 2050 will require a multi-faceted approach, including advancements in aircraft-related technology, changes to infrastructure and operations, and a dramatic increase in SAF supply. Our process technology can be an important step in this direction,” said Russ Green, Exxonmobil’s lower-emission fuels venture executive.

Proprietary Methanol to Jet Technology

Exxonmobil is leveraging its core capabilities to develop a solution that converts methanol to SAF. Methanol derived from the gasification of biomass and waste, as well as from lower-carbon hydrogen and captured carbon dioxide (CO₂), can be converted into SAF using Exxonmobil’s methanol to jet proprietary process technology and catalysts. Preliminary estimates by Exxonmobil suggest that this solution has a higher yield of jet fuel than other options. The Exxonmobil solution also provides the flexibility to use a mix of alcohols as feedstock and produce renewable diesel and lower-carbon chemical feedstocks.

“Methanol to jet technology is scalable and suitable for the conversion of methanol produced from today's world-scale plants. The work necessary to qualify the resulting renewable jet fuel pathway has already started,” said James Ritchie, president of Exxonmobil Catalysts and Licensing.

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