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South American Silica Project Evonik Builds Silica Plant in Brazil

| Editor: Dominik Stephan

Evonik invests a mid-double-digit million Euro sum in a new silica plant in Brazil. With this project, the company hopes to cash in on the growing South American automotive and tire market.

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"With this investment in Brazil, we are positioning ourselves as an innovative provider of advanced inorganic materials for resource-conserving applications in the important South American market." – Patrik Wohlhauser, Executive Board Member and Chief OperatingOfficer of Evonik
"With this investment in Brazil, we are positioning ourselves as an innovative provider of advanced inorganic materials for resource-conserving applications in the important South American market." – Patrik Wohlhauser, Executive Board Member and Chief OperatingOfficer of Evonik
(Picture: Evonik)

São Paulo/Brazil – Evonik Industries plans to have its new plant for precipitated silicas in Americana (São Paulo, Brazil) up and running in 2016. This will be the first production plant for highly dispersible (HD) silica in South America, the company says. This high-growth silica is used mainly for high-quality low rolling resistance tires

Patrik Wohlhauser, Executive Board Member and Chief Operating Officer of Evonik Industries: "With this investment in Brazil, we are positioning ourselves as an innovative provider of advanced inorganic materials for resource-conserving applications in the important South American market."

The tire industry profits from the growth in the automotive industry, which has recorded considerable increases in sales in South America over the past years. The market for low rolling resistance tires and, consequently, for HD silicas, has been growing much stronger than the market for conventional tires in South America. Evonik expects additional demand because of the planned labeling of the energy efficiency of tires in Brazil.

The use of silica in combination with silanes means that tires can be produced with a much lower rolling resistance, which can reduce fuel consumption by up to eight percent (compared to conventional automobile tires). Consequently, low rolling resistance tires contribute towards climate protection. Johannes Ohmer explains: "We are the only manufacturer that offers both components and are thus a competent partner for highperformance tire compounds for our customers in the tire and rubber industries."

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