Search

Magnetocalorics Research Cooperation BASF Cooperates on New Magnetic Materials with Dutch Research Foundation

Editor: Dominik Stephan

BASF and Dutch research foundation FOM aim to jointly develop new magnetocaloric materials. Their specific properties could make these substances potent cooling media in the future.

BASF enters a new research cooperation with the Dutch foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM) on magnetocaloric effects. The company believes magnetocalorics to become an important cooling medium in the future. (Picture: BASF)
BASF enters a new research cooperation with the Dutch foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM) on magnetocaloric effects. The company believes magnetocalorics to become an important cooling medium in the future. (Picture: BASF)

Utrecht/Netherlands – BASF and The Dutch foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM) strengthen their cooperation: a new four years joint research programme shall help to utilize the principles of magnetocaloric substances. "We aim at an even better understanding of the fundamental magnetocaloric principles, which will help us to develop new materials with improved properties and we will investigate the best routes for large-scale production," says programme leader Prof. Dr. Ekkes Brück (TU Delft).

Between Academic Research and Industrial Ambitions: IIP–Cooperations

BASF and FOM cooperate within an Industrial Partnership Programme (IPP), that couples academic researches with industrial ambitions. Financing these IIPs is done to at least fifty percent by the indsutrial partner. The research will be executed at TU Delft, Radboud University Nijmegen and at the research sites of BASF in De Meern (Netherlands) and Ludwigshafen (Germany). Both partners already worked together in a research on magnetocaloric effects started in 2008. Together with industrial partners, the scientists want to introduce the first cooling devices based on the magnetocaloric effect in the near future.

Magnetocalorics – Tomorrows Cooling Media?

Magnetocalorics could play an important role in tommorow's heat-pump technologies, the researchers believe: these materials heat up in a magnetic field and cool down again when taken away from the field. This could make them an alternative technology for vapor compressor refrigeration systems or those operating with conventional cooling media. "Theoretical considerations show an energy savings potential of up to fifty percent," explains Dr. Thomas Weber, managing director of BASF Future Business GmbH. "An additional benefit is that the system based on a magnetic cooling cycle can be relatively small. This makes them ideal for many applications ranging from the cooling of electronic components to refrigerators and air conditioners.” Since no gaseous refrifgerants are used, the processes are quieter and, because of the lack of a compressor unit, less vibrating than conventional cooling systems.

(ID:28354090)